Diversity & Inclusion Office

Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality Training Materials

These are the training materials we’ll use during Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality.

Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality Webinar Part I

Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality Webinar Part II

Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality Webinar Part III

Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality Webinar Part IV

Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality Webinar Part V

Safe Zone 201: Race, Gender, Sexuality Webinar Part VI

Please complete the following exercises in the order they appear on this list.

Activity 1: Complete the Personal Identity Wheel activity. Source

Activity 2: Complete the Social Identity Wheel activity. Review Social Identity Definitions. Source

Activity 3: Reflect on the Spectrum Activity Questions below (full list here)

  • For what part of your identity do you feel you face oppression for most often?
  • For what part of your identity do you feel you receive privilege for most often?
  • Identities that have the strongest effect on how you see yourself as a person.
  • What part of your identity do you see having the most effect on your interactions with students?
  • What part of your identity do you see having the most effect on your interactions with co-workers/peers?

Activity 4: Review the Intersecting Axes of Privilege, Domination, and Oppression

Intersecting Axes of Privilege, Domination, and Oppression

Intersectionality: A term coined by feminist legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw, intersectionality originally was created to account for the ways in which black women experience both racism and sexism. The term has now expanded to account for the ways that an individual can experience multiple forms of oppression based on multiple marginalized identities. A salient quote on intersectionality is Audre Lorde’s quote “There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives.” (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Vocabulary)

Questions to Consider:

  • How do LGBTQ+ identities intersect/coexist with other aspects of identity/experience?
  • How do your own layers of identity give and take privilege?

Activity 5: Review QTPOC and LBGTQIA+ Terminology (multiple sources cited, compiled by Dr. Donnesha Blake)

Activity 6: Complete QTPOC Pop Culture Quiz and Answers (created by Dr. Donnesha Blake) 

Activity 7: Review Human Rights Campaign State Laws and Policies Map

Step 1: First, take a look at the rights granted to Michigan LGBTQIA+ citizens.

Step 2: Compare Michigan to other states in the United States.

Step 3: Now consider how race plays a role in shaping these rights. The presentation has some highlights, but below are a few reports that demonstrate that LGBTQIA+ people of color are more likely to live in poverty, have inequitable access to paid leave, and are most vulnerable to state violence and other forms of violence.

UCLA Williams Institute Study on LGBT Poverty in the United States (October 2019)

Violence in the Transgender Community in 2019, 2020 tracked by HRC.

Video: TDOR (Transgender Day of Remembrance): “People can start standing up now”

Note: Many of these deaths go unreported or misreported. You can also view the reports for 2015-2018.

HRC’s LGBTQ Working People of Color Need Paid Leave: Stories and Findings from the 2018 U.S. LGBTQ Paid Leave Survey

Another intersection we should consider is age, in this case LGBTQ youth and elders. The following are full reports focusing on LGBTQ Black, Latinx, and Asian Pacific Islander youth.

Supporting and Caring for Our Latino LGBTQ Youth (Original Source)

2019 Black and African American LGBTQ Youth Report (Original Source)

2019 Asian and Pacific Islander LGBTQ Youth Report (Original Source)

Video: “I Came Out to My Friends in English. I Came Out to My Mom in Vietnamese.”

Questions to Consider

  • How does race shape one’s gender identity and/or expression and sexual identity?
  • How might coming out look different for people of color?
  • What role do you think race might play when someone is transitioning?

Let’s Take a Closer Look

Activity 8: Start off with one case study, read it over and reflect on the following questions:

Case Studies (click link)

Work Stages (Safe Zone Project, SZP)

  1. Clarify the Problem
  2. Identify Options
  3. Weight Outcomes
  4. Do it. Listen. Reassess
  • What strategy/ies would you use? (SZP)
  • What do you think the impact of using those strategies would be? (SZP)
  • How could you prevent the scenario from happening? (SZP)
  • What might you do immediately after or following up later in the week after the scenario? (SZP)
  • What role does race play in helping you understand the issue or identify the problem?

#MoreColorMorePride

In June 2017, the city of Philadelphia adopted a revised pride flag. They added a black and brown stripe to symbolize and highlight Black and Brown people with the LGBTQ+ community. This was apart of the Philadelphia Office of LGBT Affairs’ More Color More Pride Campaign.

Amber Hikes (below) is responsible for the adoption of the new flag Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office of LGBT Affairs for the City of Philadelphia, she is now the Chief Diversity Officer at ACLU in New York City.

In 2017, Philadelphia adopted a revised flag with a brown and black stripe.In 2017, Philadelphia adopted a revised flag with a brown and black stripe.

Amber Hikes is responsible for the adoption of the new flag Executive Director of the Mayor's Off...Amber Hikes is responsible for the adoption of the new flag Executive Director of the Mayor's Office of LGBT Affairs for the City of Philadelphia, she is now the Chief Diversity Officer at ACLU in New York City.

Story published on March 17, 2020