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Faculty Art Show: Drawings, Photography, Figurative Sculpture

Exhibit features the artwork of Jillian Dickson, Benjamin Lambert and Sandy Lopez-Isnardi.

<em>"Butterfly," Jillian Dickson, Graphite, Gouache and Colored Pencil on Paper</em> "Butterfly," Jillian Dickson, Graphite, Gouache and Colored Pencil on Paper

Art faculty at Alma College are using drawings, figurative ceramic sculptures and photography to analyze various relationships between humans and the natural environment.

The exhibit in the Flora Kirsch Beck Gallery, which opened Monday, Nov. 7, and continues through Thursday, Dec. 8, features the artwork of Jillian Dickson, Benjamin Lambert and Sandy Lopez-Isnardi.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, and 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturdays. A closing reception with the artists will be held Thursday, Dec. 8, from 7 until 9 p.m. Admission to the gallery is free and open to the public.

“Early on there was little discussion of what each artist would exhibit; yet, once the exhibits were placed, it was found that they shared an underlying theme — human interruption of the natural world,” says Lambert.

Dickson displays pieces featuring a variety of traditional drawing materials. Her subjects are primarily barnyard animals that appear tied together in both a literal and emotional sense. Through these, she examines ethical farming and the living conditions of animals bred for human consumption.

Lambert showcases primarily figurative ceramic sculptures. These include hanging wrecking ball forms that are personified with animal features, wall hangings of familiar characters and the busts of crusty fishermen. Lambert’s pieces typically evolve through his analysis of human-caused disasters and while toying with various scenarios or visual symbols.

The works of Lopez-Isnardi portray the landscapes of Northern Scotland and Alaska. These photos analyze how humankind has altered these environments in both direct and indirect ways. With a portion of her prints addressing the Alaskan pipeline installation, connections can be drawn to the recent concerns raised by the Dakota pipeline and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribes. 

Story published on November 09, 2016