Engineering

Requirements & Courses

  • The engineering programs at Alma College share a common core, and students must choose a specific major that builds on that foundation, as detailed below.

    Engineering Core (33–36 credits)

    1. EGR-130 and 330
    2. MTH-121 and 122
    3. PHY-121 and 122
    4. CSC-115
    5. EGR-385 (3–4 credits): At least 200 hours of service learning, research, or internship in engineering or a related area. (Engineering Science majors may take 1–4 )
    6. EGR-430: Capstone Project
  • Computer Engineering

    52 credits beyond the core, for a total of 87 credits. These must consist of:

    1. MTH 120, 310, 336, and 341
    2. CHM 115
    3. CSC 121, 230, 240, and 310
    4. EGR 250, 350, 450, and 460
  • Electrical Engineering

    52 credits beyond the core, for a total of 87 credits. These must consist of:

    1. MTH 210, 211, and 341
    2. PHY 321 and 431
    3. CHM 115
    4. CSC 121
    5. EGR 250, 255, 350, 450, and 460
    6. Four credits of elective EGR topics (EM or electronics) at the 400-level.
  • Engineering Science

    32 credits beyond the core, forming an intentional concentration on some area of applied science (such as Environmental or Biomedical Engineering) that must be approved by the department, for a total of 65 credits. These must include:

    1. MTH 210 and 211
    2. PHY 212 or EGR 250
    3. Eight credits of PHY courses at the 300-level or higher (some require PHY-221)
    4. Twelve credits of additional upper-level courses in EGR, CSC, or natural science disciplines other than PHY or MTH.
  • Program Considerations

    Students in dual-degree engineering programs may need to complete ECN-111 or 112: check the detailed requirements for individual programs. MTH-310 is highly recommended. Due to the restrictions on double counting of credits, double majors between engineering and PHY, CSC, or MTH are usually impractical; minors in those fields may be possible but challenging.

  • Note on ABET accreditation:

    The Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering majors have been designed to meet the expectations for ABET accreditation, but they do not yet have that designation. The Engineering Science major is not designed to meet ABET accreditation standards. Students who intend to continue their careers as professional engineers, who plan to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination, or who plan to continue their education with an MSc or MSE may require additional work and/or professional experience to qualify.

Courses

  • EGR
    130
    .
    Digital Fabrication
    4 credits
    Students will learn to design 3D structures using computer-aided software (e.g. Autocad) and fabricate them using diverse manufacturing processes like additive manufacturing (3D printing), laser cutting, and CNC machining. This is a hands-on class with lab, open to students who would like to design and fabricate their own game pieces, art components, experimental equipment, to reproduce archeological artifacts or biological structures, or other possibilities. Laboratory.
  • EGR
    140
    .
    Machine Shop
    2 Credits
    Introduction to machine shop tools, techniques, and safety. Student projects may include experimental apparatus, artistic work, or other items of interest. Offered every winter. Course fee.
  • EGR
    250
    .
    Electric Circuits
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: PHY-122
    Study of theory and applications of analog electronics. Includes DC and AC circuit theory, basic network analysis, filter responses, semiconductor devices, power supplies, amplifiers, and introduction to microcontrollers. Laboratory.
  • EGR
    255
    .
    Electric Circuits II
    4 Credits
    Continuation of EGR-250 with emphasis on alternating current (AC) circuits. Students will analyze circuits using concepts including phasors, sinusoidal steady-state analysis, AC power, RMS values, three-phase systems, and frequency response. Laboratory. Course fee.
  • EGR
    255L
    .
    EGR-255 Lab
    0 Credits
    EGR-255 Lab
  • EGR
    330
    .
    Engineering Workshop
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: EGR-130 and either PHY-212 or EGR-250
    Students will develop an understanding of the relationship between engineering, science, and culture. They will work on cross-disciplinary projects, creating interactive physical objects by combining mechanical, electronic, and computing systems. In the process, they will use the models and knowledge acquired from their major to understand our relationship with technology and society. Laboratory.
  • EGR
    350
    .
    Solid State Devices
    4 Credits
    Students will investigate semiconductor devices and fabrication. They will study electrical transport in semiconductors and electron-hole pair recombination, and they will apply these concepts to the theory and operation of diodes and transistors (both field-effect and bipolar junction types). Laboratory.
  • EGR
    350L
    .
    EGR-350 Lab
    0 Credits
    EGR-350 Lab
  • EGR
    385
    .
    Internship/Service Learning
    1 credit
    Prerequisite: EGR-130 and either PHY-212 or EGR-250
    Service learning, research, or internship in engineering or related area. A capstone project cannot count towards this course.
  • EGR
    430
    .
    Engineering Capstone
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: EGR-330
    Students will plan and develop a capstone project that applies their specialized skills in engineering and science to a complex problem. The project will demonstrate expertise in engineering practices and fundamentals.
  • EGR
    450
    .
    Embedded Systems
    4 Credits
    Students will develop low-power systems with hardware, software, sensors, actuators, and controllers. Students may explore applications in robotics, medical devices, automotive industry, instrumentation, and communications, among others. Laboratory. Course fee.
  • EGR
    450L
    .
    EGR-450 Lab
    0 Credits
    EGR-450 Lab
  • EGR
    460
    .
    Systems and Signals
    4 Credits
    Students will learn the foundations of Laplace transforms, Fourier series, and Fourier transforms, including the implications of poles and zeros, convolution, impulse and step responses, and frequency responses. They will apply these tools to electric signal analysis and the analysis of continuous and discrete systems. Students will explore applications from engineering and physics, including feedback and control, communications, and signal processing.