American Studies

Requirements & Courses

  • Minor Requirements

    Thirty credits which must include:

    1. Core: AMS-101, 102, and 301 and 16 credits from the following (no more than one course per department): ECN-111; ENG-260 or 261; HST-104, 105, 228; POL-101; and SOC-101.
    2. Advanced Electives: eight credits from the following (no more than one course per department): ART-250; ENG-361 or 366; HST-277, 323, 325, or 326; POL-231, 325 or 336; and SOC-241 or 380A; or other approved (with substantial American content) topics courses (e.g., African American literature or religion, Native-American literature, etc.) AMS independent study or practicum subject to approval of the AMS coordinator.

Courses

  • AMS
    101
    .
    Introduction to American Studies
    2 credits
    Prerequisite: First- year or Sophomore Standing
    Focuses on the multi-disciplinary perspectives needed to understand the complexity of “the American experience(s).”
  • AMS
    102
    .
    Perspective American Experience
    2 credits
    Prerequisite: First- year or Sophomore Standing
    Focuses on seminal sources for deepening one’s perspectives on “America.”
  • AMS
    301
    .
    American Studies Seminar
    2-4 credits
    Prerequisite: AMS 101 and 102
    Open only to students who have completed or are concurrently enrolled in the completion of 24 credits toward the AMS minor.
  • ART
    250
    .
    Sculpture I
    4 credits
    An investigation of both traditional and contemporary materials, methods, and subject matter. Form will be approached through processes that utilize addition, subtraction, manipulation and transformation. Course fee.
  • ENG
    260
    .
    Survey of American Literature I
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: ENG-101, 120, 201 or 202
    Analyzing American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War, including the Puritan and Romantic periods.
  • ENG
    261
    .
    Survey of American Literature II
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: ENG-101, 120, 201 or 202
    Examining American literature from the Civil War and the Realistic movement to the present.
  • ENG
    361
    .
    Modern American Writers to 1865
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: Two courses in literature
    Examines in depth selected writers from the Revolution to the Civil War, with a special focus on the struggle to define an “American” literature. Includes such authors as Brown, Irving, Poe, Douglass, Jacobs, Dickinson, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman and Stowe.
  • ENG
    366
    .
    Modern American Literature
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: Two courses in literature
    Studies of American literature from post-WWII to the present.
  • HST
    104
    .
    The Making of America to 1877
    4 credits
    Examines American history from colonial times to Reconstruction; concentration on political, constitutional, social, economic and intellectual problems. (ESPITH/GP)
  • HST
    105
    .
    The American Century: 1877-Present
    4 credits
    Political, economic, social and intellectual issues from Reconstruction to the present. Focuses on 1877-1990. (ESPITH/GP)
  • HST
    228
    .
    Immigration & Ethnicity in American Hist
    4 credits
    Examination of the experiences of immigrants and their transformation into ethnic Americans during the 19th and 20th centuries. Discussion of what it means to be American and the diversity of American society in a historical perspective. (ESPI/GP)
  • HST
    277
    .
    Am Studies: Civil War and Reconstruction
    4 credits
    Examines sectional crisis, disunion and reunion from 1845-77. Topics include significance of Civil War era for industrialization; agriculture and urbanization; emancipation of slaves and race relations; development of the Presidency; constitutional issues; and modern warfare. (ESPI)
  • HST
    323
    .
    Creating the Republic, 1763-1815
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing, and one history course or Permission
    Analysis of selected economic, social, political and intellectual issues, including the coming of the American Revolution; “state-building” during the war for Independence; the “Critical Period,” ratifying the Constitution; origins and early development of political parties, ideologies of republicanism and nationalism; diplomatic problems and territorial expansion; minorities in the early republic; and the War of 1812. (ESPI/GP)
  • HST
    325
    .
    Reform and Search for Order
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing, and one history course or Permission
    Urban revolution; middle class reforms; response of industry, labor, and public institutions to the progressive era; World War I; the Jazz Age; the stock market crash of 1929; and the Hoover administration. (ESPITH/GP)
  • HST
    326
    .
    The Roosevelt Revolution, 1932-45
    4 credits
    Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing, and one history course or Permission
    Analysis of the Great Depression, the New Deal, American isolation in 1930s, and American involvement in World War II. Historical perspectives of the New Society which emerged from the Great Depression and World War II. (ESPITH/GP)
  • POL
    101
    .
    The American Political System
    4 credits
    Study of institutions and processes of politics and government. Contemporary political problems. Primary focus on federal government with some attention to state and local politics. (APP)
  • POL
    231
    .
    American Political Thought
    4 credits
    Explores American political thought from the founding to the present. Key themes considered include majority rule and minority rights, participatory versus elite theories of democracy, the tensions between democracy, freedom and equality, and civil disobedience. (THE)
  • POL
    325
    .
    U.S. Foreign Policy
    4 credits
    Study of goals of American foreign policy and U.S. role in changing world; structure, processes and politics of foreign policy-making; and U.S. foreign policy since end of WWII. Analysis of selected current U.S. foreign policy concerns. (INR)
  • SOA
    101
    .
    Principles of Sociology
    4 credits
    Introduction to concepts and methods of sociology: society and its institutions, social and cultural change, and their implications. Prerequisite for all other Sociology courses except those in the Anthropology sequence. Computer laboratory; no prior computer experience required.