Newsroom

Senior Art Majors Display Their Capstone Works

“My capstone experience has shown me that art is not ‘easy.’ You don’t turn off your brain while creating. Instead, you’re always thinking because every image, every line and every angle affects the message you’re trying to convey.” — Annamarie Williams

<em>Senior Art Show, 2016.</em>Senior Art Show, 2016.

Senior art majors at Alma College display their final works in the Flora Kirsch Beck Gallery from Monday, March 20 through Friday, April 21.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, and 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturdays. A gala reception with the artists will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 9.

The annual Senior Art Show features the capstone works of each of the graduating seniors. On exhibit this year are traditional and nontraditional drawings, paintings, sculptural forms, prints, photography and a zine.

Artists include:

  • Emily Allison, Jackson senior
  • Sarah Bishop, Alma senior
  • Marcella Flury, Dearborn Heights senior
  • Reilly Gordon, Rochester Hills senior
  • Emily Price, Grand Rapids senior
  • Josie Sabo, Coopersville senior
  • Annamarie Williams, Midland senior

“While a capstone experience has been required for graduation for quite some time, the process began to drastically evolve last year,” says Jillian Dickson, assistant professor of art and design.

“Rather than exhibiting class assignments done throughout their time at Alma College, students are now required to create a unified body of work,” says Dickson. “This is an incredibly rigorous task that takes a full academic year to complete.”

Sabo displays a zine — a type of self-published magazine featuring original creative work.

“I chose this medium because it is a digest of photography, writing, graphic design and web design,” says Sabo, an art and new media studies double major.

Williams displays drawings and watercolors that address social issues.

“When you have something to say, and you let your art take over your heart and mind; when you close your mouth and open your heart to speak through your artwork; that is when art becomes the most powerful,” says Williams. “Crafting a unified body of work allows this level of expression.

“Above all, my capstone experience has shown me that art is not ‘easy,’” says Williams. “You don’t turn off your brain while creating. Instead, you’re always thinking because every image, every line and every angle affects the message you’re trying to convey.”

Story published on March 20, 2017
43.380703; -84.672332